Keep Those Trannys Rolling - March - 2022

Would You Like Some Whine with That 10R80?

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In this issue of “Keep Those Trannys Rolling,” we’ll take a look at a 2019 Ford Ranger equipped with a 2.3 L engine and a 10R80 transmission. The 2019 Ford Ranger arrived at our shop with the customer complaining about a low-speed whining noise while driving. The customer described the noise as a “high pitched” whine-type noise. The customer indicated that the noise was most apparent while accelerating or coasting at low speeds.

INITIAL INSPECTION:

Before test driving the vehicle, it’s always a good idea to perform an initial inspection of the vehicle to make sure there are no safety concerns. We checked hoses, belts, wiring, and connections. Everything was in good shape. We verified that all fluids levels were full. We lifted the vehicle up on the rack to inspect the underside of the vehicle. We visually inspected the drive-train, including the engine, transmission, driveline, differential, and suspension. Everything looked good under the vehicle. With the initial inspection completed, it was time to head out for our initial test drive to see if we could duplicate the “high pitch” whine noise.

INITIAL TEST DRIVE:

We drove the vehicle through city streets, ranging from 5-45 mph. We then drove it on the freeway to see if we could duplicate the noise at freeway speeds. During the test drive through city streets, we could duplicate a “high pitch” whining noise during acceleration or coasting to a stop. We could not duplicate the “high pitch” whine noise while driving at freeway speeds. The “high pitch” noise seemed to be drive-train related. Having duplicated the “high pitch” whine noise during the test drive, it was time to head back to the shop to see if we could diagnose this concern.

BACK AT THE SHOP:

After returning to the shop, we lifted the vehicle up on the rack to inspect the drive-train components. Everything looked good. While on the rack, we had a technician start the engine and run it through the gears to see if we could locate the noise. We could not duplicate the noise while on the rack. Without being able to duplicate the noise on the rack, we knew we would have to test drive the vehicle again to locate and isolate it. We attached three chassis-ear clips to the transmission’s front, middle, and rear sections. We also attached a chassis-ear clip to the pinion area of the differential. With our chassis-ear clips installed, it was time to head out for another test drive to see if we could locate and isolate the source of the noise.

LOCATING AND ISOLATING THE NOISE:

We headed out for another test drive to see if we could locate and isolate the noise. Again, we drove through city streets, ranging from 5-45 mph. The whining noise was evident at around 18-25 mph during acceleration and while coasting to a stop. The whining noise would stop if the transmission were shifted to neutral during coasting. With the chassis-ear clips connected to the transmission and differential, we could locate and isolate the noise to the rear section of the transmission. With the “high pitch” noise located and isolated, it was time to head back to the shop to remove, disassemble and inspect the transmission.

TRANSMISSION REMOVAL, DISASSEMBLY, AND INSPECTION:

We removed the transmission and disassembled it for inspection. We found the inner and outer output shaft bearings showing signs of wear (figure 1). We pressed out the inner & outer output shaft bearings and sleeve from the case (figure 2). We replaced the inner output shaft bearing (HL3Z-7A415-C), the outer output shaft bearing (HL3Z-7A415-B), passage sleeve (HL3Z-7A283-A) and installed a new output shaft seal (figure 3). We reassembled the transmission and installed it into the vehicle. After filling the transmission with fluid, we started the vehicle and shifted the transmission through the gears to verify the transmission was shifting properly. With the transmission shifting properly and no signs of leaks, it was time to head out for our final test drive.

FINAL TEST-DRIVE:

After replacing the output shaft bearings and sleeve, we were confident that we had located, isolated, and repaired the “high pitch” whine noise coming from the transmission. During our final test drive, we drove the vehicle through city streets ranging from 5-45 mph. We accelerated and coasted down to a stop. The whining noise was gone. We drove the vehicle on the freeway and verified that there was no noise. We returned to the shop and inspected the transmission for leaks. There were no leaks. We contacted the customer and arranged for the vehicle to be picked up.

Well, we did it again. We located and isolated noise complaint with the chassis ears. With a little patience, you too can conquer the 10R80 whine and “Keep Those Trannys Rolling.”